The olden days.

INTRO:

This post has been a long time coming. Britchy nominated me for “Ancient Philosophers’ Quotes” challenge back in June, but [insert a tons of excuses].

However, I took a glimpse at my “drafts”, and realized that section was too chaotic. New “posts” were created with some nominations, some ideas, some links, etc. It was not serving me in any way, so I decided to organize it. Cleaning one draft at a time.

Progress!

RULES:

•Choose the author or philosopher (it should be one from the Ancient Times). Don’t know anyone? Google it, It shouldn’t be so hard.

•Choose 3 quotes of this author/philosopher. The country of origin – doesn’t matter (Egypt, Greece…Italy). Add any info or explanation if you like.

•Share those quotes and nominate 3 to 6 people.

•The title for the post? Choose something cool.

QUOTES:

This challenge brought me back to my high-school/ university philosophy classes. I miss those days. Those ridiculous on the surface, but fascinating conversations with my colleagues and professors… Naturally, I could not just pick 1 philosopher. And 3 quotes were not enough, either.

Persuasion is achieved by the speaker’s personal character when the speech is spoken as to make us think him credible. We believe good men more fully and more readily than others. This is true generally whatever the question is, and absolutely true where exact certainty is impossible and opinions are divided. — Aristotle

That is just pure psychology. We just naturally trust people who are neatly dressed, are well spoken, and are of a certain status. Believing a ragged homeless person does not seem to come as easily. Just look at various experiments in which the same person begged for money pretending to be:
a) dirty and homeless.
b)in a suit.

Why is it that we do not treat people equally? That is how politicians get to be elected time and time again. They seem so polished that they just CANNOT be wrong, or lying. Right? Wrong!

It is a cognitive bias we cannot completely eradicate. However, once you become aware of that bias, you can make a conscious decision to be on an alert. To not believe everything a confident, well-dressed person says. And if you are someone that wants to convince others – dress neatly, brush your hair, and be confident.

Anybody can become angry – that is easy, but to be angry with the right person and to the right degree and at the right time and for the right purpose, and in the right way – that is not within everybody’s power and is not easy. — Aristotle

Is that not the truth? I think that is just so spot on. I deal with misdirected anger on a near-every-day basis. Instead of getting angry with such people, I calmly ask what I have done to cause their reactions. Sometimes that is sufficient for them to detach and treat me not as their enemy. People bring home problems to work. I can empathize, but do not take it out on me. There is not much more I want to say regarding this. I just think it is a brilliant quote. My favorite one of the bunch.

Most powerful is he who has himself in his own power. — Seneca

We often try to change others, without even glancing at ourselves. It is my believe that we need to keep working on ourselves. We cannot let emotions rule us. It is helpful to listen to them, but ultimately, we should be the ones making conscious (not impulsive) decisions. We all have faults, but we need to recognize them and make sure that they are not deterring us from being the best versions of ourselves. That is why I like introspection, and understanding why I do the things I do. One should understand themselves.

Good people do not need laws to tell them to act responsibly, while bad people will find a way around the laws. — Plato

I feel like that is spot on for the times we live in. We talk about how we need to ban guns and drugs. I do not oppose smart measures, but it seems that not everyone is aware of the fact that “bad people will find a way around the laws”. Mic drop.

No man ever steps in the same river twice, for it’s not the same river and he’s not the same man. — Heraclitus

I think many of us can be quick to judge others, but when it comes to ourselves, we give a pass. Naturally, we care about loved ones, but we have to let them make their own decision. We are not in their situation. We do not know all the factors they are aware of. Feel free to warn them, but do not overstep. Maybe they are not stupid for stepping back in. Maybe they are just more courageous than you.

MY NOMINATIONS:

Anyone who read this post and thinks they would enjoy sharing some ancient quotes.

Stay golden,

Signature.

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43 thoughts on “The olden days.

Add yours

  1. Loved all the ancient quotes, especially the one about persuasion.
    I was just browsing through drafts too and found a lot of open thoughts, just decided to explore one and close it out. And what do you know, you did just that as well! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

        1. It also perfectly illustrates that not everyone can be your audience. If you feel differently about your writing, then it’s alright for random strangers to either like or dislike it. It’s rather comforting to me.

          Liked by 1 person

          1. Exactly!… plus, more often than not when I re-read me after quite a while I find many things that I don’t like or I would have said differently and I think “how come I didn’t get it like that at that moment?”. Also a proof of how much we change without wanting or trying to, just going through life…

            Liked by 1 person

  2. I think you already know this, but Im not much of quote / philosophy person. I didn’t understand half of the words those ancient dudes said, but your explanation makes sense!

    I’m just wondering, do you always trust a man in a suit. He probably comes across more reliable than a homeless man. But honestly, I just like to look at men in suit, but they din’t impress me much.

    Nevertheless, I have decided to take this challange and it will be in “Andrea style”. Seatbelts on! 😉

    Liked by 1 person

    1. No, I am very skeptical about people in general. I listen, but I don’t believe everything anyone says.
      But there were different experiments and studies done showing that an average person trusts a man in a suit.

      Like

  3. I relate to the Seneca quote the most. I’ve been trying to get back to my almost daily workout routine. And the instructor always say that we shouldn’t give in to our bodies. She says that our mind is powerful, and that’s what helps me not give up during the exercises.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Hi!
    All the quotes are so deep and worth-reading. But I found this one the best.
    No man ever steps in the same river twice, for it’s not the same river and he’s not the same man. — Heraclitus
    I found this quote quite thought-provoking. Once you experience a situation, you experience a change and you aren’t really the same person you used to be. And the situation, too, seems different when encountered again.
    The persuasion one was very true as well…Their great quotes and your great thoughts made a great post, Goldie!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks so much! I’m glad I provoked some thoughts. Circumstances are never the same. People tend to see the general features and think the situation is the same, but all the little things can make all the difference.

      Liked by 1 person

  5. Great Quote:

    Anybody can become angry – that is easy, but to be angry with the right person and to the right degree and at the right time and for the right purpose, and in the right way – that is not within everybody’s power and is not easy. — Aristotle

    Liked by 1 person

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