HW: #TuesdayThoughts: Philosophy of life – Who knows best?

We try to live the best life we can.

Making the right choices.

Or so we think.

Others think they know better.

They are just trying to help.

Suggest you change your ways.

Because THEY think THEIR way is the RIGHT way.

Sometimes we listen to other people’s advice. Sometimes we do not.

The truth is that in the long run, we can never be sure if we are living the way we should, or if maybe others figured it out instead.

I was just thinking about my life philosophy. Some say it is too simple and therefore silly, some think it is just plain wrong. While I listen to other people’s opinions, in general, I am pretty happy with my choices so far, and having my own best interest at heart, I believe that I am living my life the best way I can at any given time.

Being a realist, I am aware that this all might be a lie. An illusion. Maybe in a little while, I will see the light. Different from the one I think I see right now. Who knows? How can others be so sure that they are right and I am wrong?

If you ask me today if I have any regrets and if I am happy with my life, I will answer with a “no” to the first and with a “yes” to the second part of the question. But life is not over yet. The only moment that I will truly know is when my time comes.

I feel similarly about “the way of life”. How can you be sure of anything you are doing early in life? I fantasize about being a hundred years old and looking back on my life to see that it WAS a good one. That I DID chose the right path. Any and everything can be incorporated into that – lifestyle, finances, diet, family and friends, hobbies, etc. I wish to stick my tongue out at all the naysayers then. But will THEY be around then?

Whenever someone turns 100 years old (or more), we want to know their secret. Do you think they actually know what they did differently than their peers? An even more important question – Will you listen to THEIR advice? I hope to tell younger generations about my secrets to a great life, but will they listen? Probably not. Maybe because not every solution applies to everyone’s problems. Or maybe because it will be a different generation. With different problems and different perceptions.

Stay golden,

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158 thoughts on “HW: #TuesdayThoughts: Philosophy of life – Who knows best?

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  1. Trust your gut feeling about what’s wrong and what’s right! There’s no general guidance how to live properly and get the most out of it. What is enough for you, can be to little for someone else. Respect people’s choices even if they are not yours. The secret of the hundred year olds? Luck, I would say. Strong DNA that prevented them from getting a serious illness. Mental flexibility to cope with the nasty things in life. And a overall understanding that your life is too short to waist time on controlling the life’s of others as well!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I wouldn’t trust my gut for a moment. How many people have “let their hearts guide them,” and their hearts guided them straight into disaster? Besides, my emotions will tell me one thing, and five minutes later tell me something. Nope, not a good guide, unless you like being yanked around.

      Liked by 2 people

  2. I’ve had these thoughts myself. What if I went right? I’m still searching for my path on many levels. Deep down there is a Real Ash that I lost a very long time ago, but I’m never giving up on finding him again. Thanks for the read. Very interesting post.

    Liked by 1 person

        1. Not that odd to me, but always good to hear. – Feel free to consider my comment another sign. 😉 If you look for the signs, you may very well find them to be less and less “rare.” I know I do. It keeps life exciting.
          You are welcome at “Seeking Divine Perspective” any time.

          Liked by 2 people

    1. That’s what I’m saying. There are so many different paths. So many ifs and buts. You’d go crazy if you split hair on every decision ever made.

      As for Real Ash, try and hone in on who that Real Ash was. What made him different from who you are now. And then go and try to live that way. Following his path might lead you to him quicker than just “looking for him”.

      Liked by 2 people

  3. Do I have regrets? Yes. Did I always choose the right path? No. But did I learn from my mistakes? Absolutely. That is the key, in my opinion. A self-reflective life is the one for me – the ability to look back and learn and grow from my mistakes is my purpose. Not happiness or contentment or adventure (although all those things can be naturally occurring by-products) but GROWTH, into a wiser human being. If I am lucky enough to live a long life, that is what I will tell people who want to know my “secret”.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. I think the secret to life is simple, we must fulfill our most simple duties. I’ve never heard a person regret having children, I’ve never heard a person regretting working hard to provide for their family. The secret to life is simple, have a family and raise responsible adults. Everything else will take care of itself.

    Liked by 2 people

      1. That’s such a small population that it is hardly significant, however, for those who cannot procreate. Not those who are unwilling, rather those who refuse. Adoption is paramount. If we refuse to raise the next generation, then what is the point of life?

        Liked by 2 people

        1. It may be a small part of the population, but to THEM it IS significant. Those who never find their “significant other” can live in perpetual disappointment, unless they find another purpose to their lives. I’m just saying that everyone has a purpose. Raising children is certainly a noble and necessary role, but those who can’t or don’t should not be written off as useless. There are other ways to serve future generations, such as teaching, counseling, healing, training, coaching, etc. Only the Creator can tell each of us what we’re here for. Trying to squeeze oneself into another’s mold can be a waste of time – or worse.

          Liked by 2 people

          1. If we weren’t meant to procreate and raise children, then why have sex? What is the purpose of any organism if not to multiply? In the most simple sense of life is to sustain life. If a person chooses not to procreate, then they will not survive.

            Liked by 1 person

                  1. Coffee likes to debate and see different points of view.
                    Thank you so much for opening up the stage for that and joining in on the journey. That’s the only way to see things we haven’t thought of. Maybe because of you, he will grow to understand the other side of things. (I’m not saying that he will, but who knows.)

                    Liked by 1 person

              1. It seems as if the third world has no problem with persistence existence. The only people that survive are those who procreate. Those who pass their lineage along. Those who instill a sense of pride about their existence.

                Any population that becomes convinced that they are the offspring of evil, will refuse to procreate. And thereby that population will become extinct.

                Liked by 1 person

                  1. Only in recent time have these screening tests come about. Midwives used to deliver babies and sterilization was of no concern.

                    Who is the authority on what is needed to develop? I would argue that recent developments have weakened the developed world.

                    Liked by 1 person

                    1. Sure. In the past those babies just died if they were not viable enough. And the chance of a mother dying was higher than it is now. No mother – no opportunity for more kids.

                      Sure, one can debate on some progress, but we should strive to be our best selves, in HIS image. Not just be. That would be too little. Too lazy.

                      Liked by 1 person

        2. I can think of many points to life, other than to raising the next generation. Not every one should/could/would parent, and that doesn’t make those individuals pointless. There are many ways to contribute to human society besides this.

          Liked by 3 people

            1. Oh, IDK. Maybe invent a life-saving vaccine or write a book that influences someone else to do something great, or be a wonderful aunt or uncle to a child that is otherwise without hope or…or…or…I’m sure if you thought about it, you could come up with some ideas too.

              Liked by 2 people

                    1. I don’t condemn anyone. I simply point out that in order for any society to thrive and survive, procreation is a must. If a person cannot procreate, then there are plenty that need to be adopted.

                      What greater sacrifice than to lay down your life for that of a loved one? That is why I said that bringing children into this world and raising them is the purpose of life.

                      Liked by 1 person

                    2. I feel like we’re moving away from the initial issue. It wasn’t about procreation not being the purpose. It was about other people being less than useful, which I think was unfair and misguided to say.

                      Yes, to survive, we obviously must procreate. But do we thrive only by procreating? What about living vs. existing? Some people just are. Drifiting. Doing nothing. Sometimes just being is not enough to be thriving.

                      Dying for a loved one is commendable, but I think there has to be more behind that. Dying trying to save your partner and orphaning your children in the end might not be the best of ideas.

                      Like

                1. If you think that contribution works without assistance, then you are wrong. To trivialize it – there are only a handful of professions that are considered noble. They contribute. Sure. But how? Mainly on the backs of those who assist.

                  Liked by 1 person

                    1. You might have misunderstood my question. I was trying to put things in perspective. To show how things work in the workplace. How there are faces of the company and then all the blue collar workers who propel the company.

                      I think competition can be good, because it makes us try to do better.

                      Liked by 1 person

                  1. Assistance would be a secondary function, a way to pass along lessons learned and best practices. How can anyone be an authority figure if they themselves have never been in the same situation?

                    Would you take parenting advice from a person who was never married or a parent themselves?

                    Liked by 1 person

          1. The same that made our parents and grandparents qualified. Any society that empowers its citizens to not procreate, will soon be gone.

            Look at how people will often cite how white people are becoming the minority. Is that due to education or success? Or is that due to the popularization of the idea of child free adulthood? If we cannot undertake the same responsibilities that our parents and grandparents took, then quiet possibly we would never have existed.

            Liked by 1 person

            1. I see your empowerment point.
              But have you never heard of babies being tortured by their parents? Are these people qualified? Should they procreate?

              Fatherless Series by James C. Dobson comes to mind. I think you might find it interesting.

              Liked by 1 person

    1. I’ve heard people regret having kids. I’ve heard people regret working hard to provide for their family. So… to me, it’s very personal. We all have different goals in life. And because we are all so different, even well-intended advice can not apply.

      Liked by 2 people

  5. You have touched upon a very important topic which is close to my recent thoughts. I ask myself: who’s right? Me who tries to keep a normal life or people who sacrifice their “normal life” to follow their dreams and succeed? Shall I put everything at risk to go for the wildest dreams or shall do best of what I have today? Shall I blame my fate that I was not born in perfect circumstances destined for greatness or that I didn’t put myself in really hard work at 20 so that at 30 I could be already a star? I’m watching now VMA and I’m asking myself: how did they do all of it? What did they sacrifice? Are they happy with where they are today or they’re just pretending to be so? I’m not sure today if at the end of my days I will tell myself: You did well, my girl! I feel that there’s still a lot to do so that I feel I made the best of my life. Time flies…

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Funny that you say “time flies”… See my today’s post.

      I think you allude to the comparing thing. Even when your time comes, you might still be bitter because you didn’t get it ALL. I guess I haven’t thought of that. To, there is no peripheral vision. I sneak a look every now and then, but I access my own life as if it was the only component of the equation. Makes things easier. If and buts… Do what feels right NOW. As long as you’re an intelligent person, that should not lead you astray.

      Like

            1. I would like to have more money. That was I could choose whether I wanted to work or not. If I was to work, I would like to have a job I would feel more fulfilled in. Potentially, it would be a position through which I could help other people who wanted to do/ live better but couldn’t.

              Like

              1. Have you read a book “4-hour work week” by Tim Ferriss? It sounds like something which may give you a few great ideas on how to go for a life where you feel fulfilled and where you break the standard schemes killing your creativity. Is there any particular reason you stay at work where you don’t feel fulfilled and you cannot use all your skills?

                Liked by 1 person

                    1. I’ve done that last year (made the move). I think I am doing better now, and am hoping that it’s headed in the right direction. I just need time. (Or maybe I’m just naive…)

                      Like

    1. I agreed. But on the other hand, I’ve always been hungry for knowledge and sometimes not knowing gnaws on me. I have to hold myself down and remind myself that sometimes simple is best.

      Thank you. You as well. And stay golden!

      Like

  6. Very interesting questions indeed. I think we’re all kings and queens of the decisions we want to make. To continue on that imagery, we’ll always have counselors to give us their thoughts on what should or shouldn’t be done but we ALWAYS have the final decision and that’s what’s important, that by the end of our lives, we’ll be able to look back and say that WE chose this. And I think as long as we can say that, we’ll be happy about our lives.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. I’d like to think so, too. But I do like being right, and it would feel awful if on my deathbed I wasn’t happy with the life I have lived. You know how things look different depending on the perspective? I just hope that doesn’t drastically change.

      Liked by 1 person

  7. I may not always agree with other people’s advice, but I’ll still listen. I’m not exactly sure if I’m on the right path, but it sure isn’t an easy one. One thing I do know for sure is that I’m doing my best to do the right things and move forward, even when I feel like I’m lost and drowning in a dark sea.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. when we stop listening to more man will we find the answers to life. If you believe in a Creator or if you dont why not give the bible an actual chance. 2 Timothy 3:16.

    Liked by 1 person

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Rachael Ritchey

Worlds of Fiction

from famine to feast

recovery and growth, things that interest me, occasional deep-thoughts, and semi-regular poetry

Skeptical Heartism

Views from a skeptical heart

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